Shared from the 4/16/2019 Oakleigh Monash eEdition

Chocolate a dog gone problem

Keep Easter treats away from your pets, warns vet

Picture

Waverley Animal Hospital’s Dr Robbie Anderton with Molly and Clio.

CHOCOLATE is one of the most common toxicities we see in dogs, especially at Easter where there is always extra around the house.

And especially if left in easy to find places by the Easter bunny in the backyard.

Chocolate has several substances in it that are toxic to dogs, which dogs cannot breakdown as well as what humans can.

These act as stimulants, leading to the classic clinical signs of tremors and shaking, but can progress into more severe signs of seizures, leading to coma and death.

The darker the chocolate, the more of the stimulants the chocolate has.

So dark chocolate and cooking chocolate are the worst, milk chocolate is in the middle, and white chocolate has almost none in it at all (but can still make dogs sick from all the sugar and fat in it).

If a dog is presented to us quickly enough, we give it medication to make it vomit all the chocolate (and wrappers) up, and then use things like activated charcoal to try and prevent any more absorption.

If dogs are already showing clinical signs of chocolate toxicity, they need hospitalisation, intravenous fluids, and medications to help with the tremors, and to monitor for progression to seizures.

As long as we get the chocolate out of the dog quickly enough, their prognosis is excellent.

The prognosis for clinic staff wanting to eat chocolate after seeing it getting vomited up is not great though.

With the more severe clinical signs, as long as we can get them under control, again the prognosis is usually very good.

Dr Robbie Anderton is a Waverley Animal Hospital veterinarian.

Chocolate has several substances in it that are toxic to dogs, which dogs cannot breakdown as well as what humans can
— DR ROBBIE ANDERTON

See this article in the e-Edition Here